Social Studies

Global History I

Global History 1 is the first part of a two-year Global History sequence, culminating in a regent’s exam at the end of the 10th grade. In Global History 1 (grade 9), world history is studied chronologically from the dawn of man to European exploration of the Americas (c.1600). Major themes include cultural diffusion, patterns of settlement and migration, religions and connections to our world today.

Global History II (Regents Exam required)

Prerequisite: Global History I

Global History II (Social Studies 10) is the second year of a two-year sequence in Global History and Geography. During this school year, we will examine world history from c. 1500 to today. The year will culminate in the New York State Regents Exam in Global History and Geography in June. This exam tests the students’ knowledge in BOTH years of Global History. Major themes this year include cultural blending, imperialism and aggression, global conflicts and current issues of global concern.

AP World History (Regents Exam required)

(Prerequisite: 90+ average in Global 9 and a from social studies teacher) 

Advanced Placement World History focuses on global development from approximately 1500 to the present. Students will develop critical and interpretive skills as well as their ability to examine and analyze historical issues from a “big-picture” perspective. This is a reading/writing intensive class. In May, students will take the AP exam. This exam includes coursework from students’ Global History 9 class. College credit may be earned by students who perform well on the AP exam.

United States History and Government (Regents Exam required)

United States History and Government is a survey course that begins with events leading up to the founding of the United States as a nation and ends with current issues of today. Roughly one third of the course deals with the Constitution and government and two-thirds deals with the history of the United States.

Seminar in Current Events (1/2 year)

This half-year course will examine current issues and problems on the local, national, and global levels. Course structure and requirements will vary by instructor, but many include a combination of class discussion, newspaper analysis, written assignments, presentations, and projects.

History Through Film II — World History (1/2 year)

Like written history, contemporary Hollywood feature films are an interpretation of their society. A major goal of this semester course is determining what is valid in contemporary films and historical dramas about World History and what these films say about the people who created them, the politics behind their creation, and how they reflect the values, ideas, and larger historical issues of the times in which they were created. Students are expected to view films, participate in class discussions, and write a series of short essays comparing the film evidence to information in more traditional sources such as articles, film review, and critical commentaries.

History Through Film I — U.S. History (1/2 year)

Like written history, contemporary Hollywood feature films are an interpretation of their society. A major goal of this semester course is determining what is valid in contemporary films and historical dramas about United States history and what these films say about the people who created them, the politics behind their creation, and how they reflect the values, ideas, and larger historical issues of the times in which they were created. Students are expected to view films, participate in class discussions, and write a series of short essays comparing the film evidence to information in more traditional sources such as articles, film review, and critical commentaries.

AP American History (Regents Exam required)

Advanced Placement American History is a college-level class open to seniors and juniors. Students will examine American political, social and cultural history from exploration to the present. This is an intellectually –demanding, writing intensive class. College credit can be earned by performing well on the AP exam given in May. Juniors taking this class will be required to take the Regents exam in United States History and Government in June in addition to the AP exam.

Participation in Government / Economics

Students will learn to be informed and productive citizens in their community. All levels of government are surveyed, your obligations as American citizens are addressed, and current issues are debated. There is a community service requirement of 12 hours, and two local legislative meetings required. Students will become economically literate. The course teaches students how to understand what is going on in our economy, overviews general investment strategies, and includes basic economic theory. Designed to prepare students for real-life economics as well as college economics.

Psychology (College Now) (1/2 year)

Grade 12 only

This course is designed to give students a solid background in the field of psychology. Topics include: the fields of psychology, methods of psychology, Principles of Learning, Intelligence and Creativity, Infancy and Childhood, Adolescence, Adulthood and Aging, Personality, and Mental Illness.

Holocaust (1/2 year)

The course will allow students to understand the history of the Holocaust; the perpetrators, the victims, and the bystanders. We will also evaluate how genocide continues in the 21st century. A related course one might consider taking before this one is WWII.

World War II (1/2 year)

The great conflict of the 1930s and the 1940s rings loud and clear in the halls of history and remains an item for extensive study. The WWII course enables a student of history, the opportunity to discover the details of the causes and effects of WWII. We will look at the leaders of the 20th century, the battles, generals, and other significant events that played a role during this time. The students will be able to understand how a world war of this magnitude happened and explain the aftermath.

AP European History

Grade 12 only

The AP European History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of European history from approximately 1450 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of European history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; and individual and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places.